DISCUSSION NEW ENEMIES


NEW ENEMIES

NATIONALISM AND GLOBALISATION IN NORTHERN EUROPE AND

Western Europeans like to view Russia as a divided society: good dissidents versus an evil state that suppresses the population and tries to force them to toe the party line. Russian, Finnish and German artists and activists advocate for a more differentiated approach and demonstrate that this type of oversimplification isn’t just a Russian problem.
 
Prior to Putin’s 2012 re-election, there were many auguries of political turmoil. Demonstrations took place, there many opposition formations, the conservative opinion supported by the Orthodox church was opposed. With the annexation of Crimea, however, the entrenched power hierarchies enjoyed resurgence in support. Media that refused to pander to the official party line, such as the broadcaster Doschd, had to retreat to the internet. Russian society appeared to be divided along two clear lines, but in addition to the two party positions of “democratic and pro-west” and “national-isolationist” there are several  nuances.  
 
The Russian artist Elena Kovylina, the Russian-German activist Alexander Formozov and the Finnish artists Ossi Koskelainen and Emmi Venna show how multifarious the opinions and attitudes inside Russian society are, how artists are on both sides of the political divide, or in-between or above. They demand a critical perspective on both the East and the West.
 


 
DISCUSSION

Date:
27/11, 9 PM (Berlin, Volksbühne am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz)
Russian and English
12 / 8 €.

Panel participants 

Alexander Formozov, Russian-German activist
Ossi Koskelainen, Finnish artist
Emmi Venna, Finnish artist
​Angelina Davydova, Russian economist